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High-key mountain peak

The textured faces of Leah Peak are highlighted by the bright side lighting of a winter day in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

Leah peak in bright win­ter light

Yes­ter­day I printed a very dark, night-time image, so I thought today I’d go the other direc­tion, and print a very bright, win­ter day­light image. Leah Peak is on the east shore of Maligne Lake in Jasper National Park, and in my opin­ion, one of the most sub­tle yet strik­ing moun­tain in the area.

I took this photo on a very bright day and it was a bright image straight out-of-camera. In Light­room I did my best to make the print as bright as pos­si­ble while retain­ing good con­trast and detail in the high­lights. I also tried con­vert­ing it to black-and-white, but I found that I missed the very slight blue in the shad­ows and warmer sun light on the shoul­ders of the ridge.

And, just for the inter­est of the real photo geeks — here are the his­tograms from yesterday’s photo and from today’s:

low-key

high-key

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Athabasca Falls in motion

After my pre­vi­ous post “Athabasca Falls in black and white” with the motion of the water cap­tured with a slow shut­ter speed to give a streaked effect, I remem­bered that I had also cap­tured some video on that morn­ing. So — for your interest’s sake — here is: a short video clip of Athabasca Falls shot at 30 fps with a shut­ter speed of 1/30th of a sec­ond at f/16; a still photo of the same com­po­si­tion cap­tured at 1/5th of a sec­ond at f/8 and iso400 (the same set­tings as the image in my pre­vi­ous post); and a photo cap­tured at 1/125th of a sec­ond (which I’ve been told best cap­tures how our eyes/brains see motion) at f/9 and iso800.

The Athabasca river flows over the granite cliffs of Athabasca Falls in Jasper National Park, Canada

Athabasca Falls II (1/5th sec)

The Athabasca river flows over the granite cliffs of Athabasca Falls in Jasper National Park, Canada

Athabasca Falls III (1/125th sec)

 
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Summer evening at Jasper Lake

Fluffy cumulus clouds are reflected in Jasper Lake on a warm late summer day in Jasper National Park, Alberta, Canada

Fine sum­mer clouds over Jasper Lake

In August 2008 I was work­ing for the Cana­dian For­est Ser­vice, doing research in pine stands west of Edmon­ton. I made this photo after leav­ing from work for the week­end and dri­ving through Jasper on the way to a friend’s wed­ding in north­ern BC. I could see the light get­ting good as I got closer to the park and, after a speed­ing ticket in Edson (d-oh!), I had a ter­rific evening mak­ing many images that I was really happy with. This Daily Print project that I’m try­ing out is a great excuse to look back into my archives to find these images that I’ve kind of for­got­ten about. Watch for more pho­tos from this August evening in the next few weeks…

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Athabasca Falls in black & white

The Athabasca river flows over the granite cliffs of Athabasca Falls in Jasper National Park, Canada

Athabasca Falls

I’ve noticed that I make a greater pro­por­tion of black-and-white images than I tend to print — so I’m going to try to cor­rect that. I took this pho­to­graph the same week­end as this photo (it was a great weekend).

And, although it’s not an uncom­mon tech­nique in land­scape pho­tog­ra­phy (espe­cially of water­falls), I also haven’t exper­i­mented much with slow shut­ter speeds and flow­ing water, although a fel­low Edmon­ton pho­tog­ra­pher, Joel Koop (see an exam­ple of his work here), has inspired me to try more.

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Mountain sunset under heavy clouds

The last light of the sun setting behind rugged peaks shines below a sky of heavy clouds

Sun­set under heavy clouds

If you’ve signed up for my newslet­ter you’ll rec­og­nize these past few images that I’ve shared — this one is from a trip to Jasper National Park that I took this spring. I was lucky enough to drive into the moun­tains just as the sun dipped below the clouds for a few min­utes before sink­ing behind the moun­tain peaks. I don’t recall my cam­era set­tings for this par­tic­u­lar image, but I was def­i­nitely think­ing of the golden rule for land­scape pho­tog­ra­phy — “f/8 and be there”.

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Spring rain over Devona Flats

A late evening spring rain falls onto the dry lakebed of Jasper Lake at Devona Flats in Jasper National Park

Spring storm over Devona Flats

I recently had the chance to get away for a few days, and had the plea­sure of being able to do some pho­tog­ra­phy in Jasper National Park. The day that I took this pho­to­graph started out clear and sunny, and as the day went along these large clouds spilled out of the Athabasca River Val­ley to the west, com­ing east towards Pocha­hon­tas where I was stay­ing. And while the clouds made it less appeal­ing to sit out on the deck in the after­noon, they sure made for much more dra­matic pho­tographs later in the evening — well worth the trade-off.

I really like the con­trast in this image of the heavy, wet sky and the falling rain streak­ing down — con­trasted with the dry river flats still await­ing the melt of higher ele­va­tion snow and the start of spring and sum­mer weather patterns.

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Bright sun on Whirlpool Mountain

Whirlpool Mountain catches the bright morning sunlight on a cold clear winter day in Jasper National Park

Bright morn­ing light on Whirlpool Mountain

Here’s another pho­to­graph from my first photo-trip of the year in Jasper National Park. I made this image from along the Ice­fields Park­way, about 20 min­utes south of the town of Jasper. I’m not sure about the name of this peak, but my best guess is that it’s Whirlpool Moun­tain, just south of Mount Edith Cavell and north of Mount Geral­dine (if any­body can confirm/correct this, please leave me a comment).

The deep blue of the sky is due mostly to the use of a polar­iz­ing fil­ter which really brought out the con­trast between the sky, the shad­ows on the moun­tain, and the bright snow-covered faces.

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